Lester’s Oil human study results

Unlike virtually all supplements on the market that rely on generic single ingredient formulas, Lester’s Oil is a much more sophisticated multi-oil formula, and to be blunt…I think it’s the best Omega-3 formula available.

Most people who make such claims would just provide a list of ingredients and their associated benefits, and that’s OK, but I wanted to go further. So we had Auckland University medical school, Nutragenomics specialist research group conduct a human trial. This is practically unheard of for a supplement company, primarily due to cost…its value in the six figure range.

Anyhow, our study is now complete, and I’d like to share with you the letter they sent out to the participants. Just skip to the conclusions if you like. This is only phase 1, but it reduced key inflammatory bio markers proving Lester’s Oil works.

Brief outline of the Study

Lester’s Oil is an Omega 3 based supplement that contains Vitamin D and powerful antioxidant rich components like Co-Enzyme Q10, selected carotenoids and phyto-chemicals deemed beneficial for health. The focus of this study was to investigate the effect of Lester’s Oil on inflammation, considered a precursor of many diseases. Thirty healthy individuals from Greater Auckland were invited to participate in this study, and twenty seven were still involved when the study ended.

Everyone (scientists, coordinators, and participants) involved in the study were blinded to the treatment regime of the participants. This was to reduce the potential for any bias or placebo effect having an impact on the measured outcomes. The placebo in this study was medium-chain triglyceride oil that did not contain any of the ingredients found in Lester’s Oil. Each participant was asked to take the placebo or Lester’s Oil capsules, two capsules daily with a main meal, for four weeks. Then there was a period of no supplementation, called the washout period also for four weeks and then the participants were asked to take the other supplement they had not taken in the first phase, for an additional four weeks.

Analysis of the samples

Blood, urine and faecal samples were collected at four times throughout the study. These were analysed by LabPlus, a medical laboratory as well as collaborative partners within Nutrigenomics New Zealand. Hence samples were sent to Plant and Food Research at Mt Albert, Ruakura (Hamilton) and Palmerston North, AgResearch in Ruakura (Hamilton) as well as analysis being undertaken at University of Auckland. The faecal samples have not been analysed as yet for changes in the bacterial colonies that inhabit our intestines, although it is possible bacterial DNA from these will be sent to the University of Bologna in Italy.

Preliminary Results

Results from the scientific laboratories are still being processed and analysed however your Lipid, C-Reactive Protein and Full Blood Count results analysed by LabPlus are included for your records.

A brief outline of the lipid test has been included for you (Appendix 1) in case you require further explanation about your results. This has been sourced online from www.bpac.org.nz.

The C Reactive Protein result is a recognised measure of inflammation and if you notice a sudden increase in this, it possibly could be attributed to an infection that you may have had at the time of that specific blood collection.

The Full Blood Count (sometimes referred to as Complete Blood Count) was measured at the start and end of the study, to ensure there was no additional change as a result of the supplement or placebo taken. If you are interested in finding out more about your results, the following website developed by a Dunedin based haematology group gives a good outline.

http://www.bpac.org.nz/resources/campaign/cbc/bpac_cbc_in_primary_care.pdf

If you have any concerns or questions about your results, please do make contact with your regular doctor. 

Interpretation of the results

When the results from all participants were combined, there was noted a significant increase in High-density lipoprotein (HDL: the good fat) in the Lester’s Oil supplemented group and a significant decrease in trigylcerides and C -reactive protein (CRP) when compared to the placebo. Changes in Cholesterol, LDL/Cholesterol ratio and low density lipoprotein (LDL) were not significantly different between the two groups.

These results can be viewed in the density graphs below (figures 1 -3). Differences between health scores received before and after each phase of the study have been calculated and where this difference has made a change there is a shift in the position of the graph. For HDL, CRP and Triglycerides the shift has been in the desired direction (as noted by the arrow) for Lester’s Oil (dotted line) when compared against the placebo (solid line).

These preliminary results do suggest that Lester’s Oil was able to improve the health status of healthy people by reducing inflammation and improving lipid profiles, specifically increasing HDL and lowering triglycerides and CRP, all of which are considered beneficial.

Figure1. Density graph showing C-Reactive Protein (CRP) scores after the consumption of Lester’s Oil or the medium-chain triglyceride placebo.

1

Figure2. Density graph showing High-density Lipoprotein (HDL) scores after the consumption of Lester’s Oil or the medium-chain triglyceride placebo

2

Figure3. Density graph showing Triglyceride scores after the consumption of Lester’s Oil or the medium-chain triglyceride placebo

3

Appendix 1: What do your lipid results mean? Sourced from www.bpac.org.nz

Total Cholesterol. Cholesterol is a waxy, fat-like substance made in the liver from the fats and oils we eat. It is important for the production of hormones and bile, and is incorporated into the cell wall of all cells. The body requires only a small amount of cholesterol to meet these needs, and when too much is present health problems such as heart disease may develop.

Cholesterol travels through the blood attached to special proteins called lipoproteins. Lipo-proteins are classified as high density, low density or very low density.

LDL Cholesterol (low density lipoprotein) is often called “bad cholesterol”. When too much LDL cholesterol circulates in the blood, it can slowly build up in the inner walls of the arteries that lead to the heart and brain. This can eventually form a thick, hard deposit called a ‘plaque’. This increases the chance of a clot forming in the artery, which may then cause a heart attack or stroke.

For most people who need to improve their lipid levels, LDL cholesterol is the main result to focus on, and it is usually best to get it as low as possible.

HDL Cholesterol (high density lipoprotein) is often known as “good” cholesterol, because high levels of HDL help to protect against heart attack. Medical experts think that HDL carries cholesterol away from the arteries and back to the liver, where it can be removed from the body. It is also thought that HDL removes excess cholesterol from any developing plaque in the arteries and slows its build-up.

Higher levels of HDL are therefore better. However, it is usually easier to lower your LDL levels than it is to increase your HDL levels.

A good way to remember the difference between LDL and HDL is that LDL is better to be Lower and HDL is better to be Higher.

Triglycerides are the main sort of fat we eat. They are an important source of energy but excess triglycerides can increase the likelihood of heart attack, stroke or obesity.

Cholesterol/HDL ratio is used to help calculate a person’s risk of a heart attack or stroke. Once the risk has been determined, it is the LDL-cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol and triglyceride levels, which are more important.

Cholesterol and triglyceride levels are strongly influenced by the foods we eat, in particular fats and oils.

www.bpac.org.

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7 Responses to Lester’s Oil human study results

  1. colleen Keesing says:

    Would Lester’s oil since it helps inflammation be of “significant value ” to eczema sufferer’s a shame there couldn’t be an evaluation on how effective it could be as at present prednisone appears to be weapon of choice on account of being a powerful anti immflamatory. Cheers Colleen Keesing

  2. Gordon Taylor says:

    I have been using Lesters Oil for a couple of years now. How reassuring it is to read the results of the stringent research carried out on the product. Personal results have been very gratifying and now I have a better understanding as to why. I was a sufferer of gout and now I am gout symtom free as I ceased taking prescribed medication soon after my daily intake of Lesters Oil. I have a friend whom I recommedned who had similarly results with his gout issues as well, in fact it was his sharing with me of the benefits that he mentioned his reduction of gout which encouraged me to go cold turkey with the prescriubed medication.

  3. janice harlen says:

    What studies, if any have been taken for Lesters Oil on individuals who may already have some inflammation of the body. What age group was represented in the study? I take Lesters Oil but am not noticing any changes in how I feel. I also take RSV Ultimate and Co Q10. I am wondering if I am taking too much of any particular supplement, eg having too much COQ10, given it is in Lesters Oil and in its own supplement. Interestingly, since I have been taking Lesters Oil, I have been getting tingles and cramps and heaviness in arms. I know this is probably not associated, but it is disappointing to have problems when I am taking supplements to boost my system. There are no significant existing health issues, except low energies.

  4. Gordon Taylor says:

    have been using Lesters Oil for a couple of years now. How reassuring it is to read the results of the stringent research carried out on the product. Personal results have been very gratifying and now I have a better understanding as to why. I was a sufferer of gout and now I am gout symtom free as I ceased taking prescribed medication soon after my daily intake of Lesters Oil. I have a friend whom I recommedned who had similarly results with his gout issues as well, in fact it was his sharing with me of the benefits that he mentioned his reduction of gout which encouraged me to go cold turkey with the prescriubed medication. – See more at: http://www.beaconhealthadvice.com/lesters-oil-human-study/#comment-58973

  5. colleen skellern says:

    Have been taking Res V+ for about 5 years now… will I combine Lesters Oil with that or just change to Lesters oil alone
    Regards Colleen

  6. Lloyd Derbyshire says:

    I would have been surprised at any other result 😉 Lester’s Oil is a smart combo. Personally I take three per day: morning, mid-day & late evening. That feels like an optimum dosage for me, however I do wonder what would have happened if they’d doubled the dose. Linearly better or only margin of error difference???

  7. Joy Millar says:

    Please could we see the actual study results & not just a copy of the letter sent to a participant.

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